Cold-Related Injuries for Outdoor Workers: Frostbite & Hypothermia (Pt. 3)

November 30, 2014

Wrapping up our blog series Cold-Related Injuries for Outdoor Workers: Frostbite &  Hypothermia, here we will continue to discuss some important info that outdoor workers should know about cold-related injuries.

While the first two parts of this blog series looked at some general facts about these injuries and what outdoor workers should know about frostbite, here, we’ll point out some important facts for outdoor workers to know about hypothermia, the most serious and deadly of all cold-related injuries.

Cold-Related Injuries: A Closer Look at Hypothermia

Hypothermia arises when the body is losing heat faster than it can produce it, causing a dangerous drop in the body’s temperature. In fact, while the normal body temperature is 98.6˚ F, hypothermia occurs when the body’s temperature has fallen to less than 95˚ F.

Of all of the cold-related injuries that can impact outdoor workers, hypothermia is the most serious and deadly. Here is what outdoor workers should know about hypothermia.

Of all of the cold-related injuries that can impact outdoor workers, hypothermia is the most serious and deadly. Here is what outdoor workers should know about hypothermia.

The longer hypothermia persists, the more dangerous and deadly this condition can be because it can cause the body’s organs and systems to start to progressively shut down without immediate and appropriate medical intervention. As a result, it’s important that all outdoor workers are well-versed in the signs and symptoms of hypothermia so they know when to get help for injured people.

Some of the most common signs of hypothermia include (but are by no means limited to):

  • Slower heart rates that can lead to weak pulse
  • Shivering
  • Disorientation, confusion and coordination problems
  • Fatigue
  • Shorter, faster, shallower breathing
  • Difficulty speaking and/or making decisions – This hypothermia symptom makes it especially important for outdoor workers to look out for each other during the winter, as people may not be able to think clearly enough to seek help once hypothermia has taken hold of them.

When outdoor workers do notice that someone is exhibiting the signs of hypothermia, they are advised to immediately call 911 and to do what they can to get the impacted person out of the cold (and out of wet clothing) and into warm, dry conditions until emergency responders arrive.

Denver Workers’ Compensation Lawyer at the Bisset Law Firm

Have you developed cold-related injuries or any type of workplace injury? If so, Denver Workers’ Compensation Attorney Jennifer Bisset wants you to know that she is here to aggressively advocate your rights and help you obtain the benefits you need and deserve.

In addition to being diligent and dedicated, Attorney Jennifer Bisset is upfront and honest. She will keep you informed of the strengths and weaknesses of your case, the choices and possibilities that you have as you move through the process, and whether it makes sense to settle your case or go to trial. And, she will always work relentlessly to help her clients’ secure the full amount of benefits to which they are entitled.

Contact Us Today

You can learn more about your rights and receive a professional evaluation of your case by contacting Denver Workers’ Compensation Lawyer Jennifer Bisset to set up an initial consultation. To set up this meeting, call (303) 894-8900. You can also email her using the contact form on this page.

From her office based in Denver, Jennifer Bisset provides superior legal services to injured people throughout Denver County and the state of Colorado.

Category: Blog,Cold Injuries,Workers' Compensation,Workplace Injuries